Why am I being Charged for my “FREE” physical? Saturday, Sep 1 2012 

Due to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), or commonly called “Obamacare”, Health Plans are starting to cover Preventive Medicine services at 100% with no copays, coinsurance or deductible. Unfortunately, insurance companies are not informing patients that dealing with medical issues during these preventive medicine visits will result in an out-of-pocket charge that could result in a co-payment, or a substantial out-of-pocket expense if they have not met their deductible. Insurance companies require all services to be itemized and coded appropriately. One of the primary reasons is to prevent the health plans from paying for services that are not covered. Providers cannot code problem visits as preventive because this would be insurance fraud and could result in the insurance company denying the claim, dropping the physician from their network, and/or, if a government plan, the physician can face imprisonment and fines.

This has resulted in patients becoming angry with their doctor’s offices. Many practices are trying to figure out how to deal with this issue. At my practice, we notify patients before their preventive visit by posting signs on the exam room walls and the medical assistant provides a written notification for the patient to sign that they understand the billing policy. We are also trying to have the physician alert the patient, during the preventive medicine visit, when their concerns become a medical visit and may result in an out-of-pocket expense to the patient. Depending on the severity of the patient’s concern, the physician may be obligated to address the medical issue because, if he didn’t, it could result in a bad outcome for the patient. For example, if the patient states that they have been dizzy and having terrible headaches, this could mean that the patient may have a brain tumor or other significant medical issue. If the physician ignored this complaint, it would harm the patient or could harm others if the patient were driving a vehicle and had an episode. In addition, this would easily become a malpractice lawsuit against the physician.

Some physicians have chosen not to do both a preventive medicine visit and a problem visit on the same day. If the patient is scheduled for a wellness visit and a problem comes up, the physician would either make the decision to change the visit to a problem-oriented visit and reschedule the preventive if the problem is high risk; or have the patient return to deal with the problem issue at a later date if the problem is a low risk. This method keeps the appointments separate and easier for the patient to understand the difference. The downside is that it requires the patient to come back for a second visit, taking additional time off work, to deal with something that could have been handled during one visit.

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Woman charged extra for asking doctor too many questions Saturday, Aug 8 2009 

Woman charged extra for asking doctor too many questions | 3 ON YOUR SIDE |
Arizona | azfamily.com

by Gary Harper/3 On Your Side

August 5, 2009

A Valley woman says she has a billing problem with her doctor’s office.

The billing problem has to do with a “well woman exam,” basically it is an annual physical for women.

The woman you are about to meet says it was supposed to be covered 100% by her insurance carrier, so why does she keep getting billed by the doctor’s office?

Shannon Karal, like a lot of women, knows the importance of having an annual physical. She says, “I do all my preventative visits for dentist, doctor, any of the normal things I try to go as much as they say you should go.”

So Shannon scheduled a well woman exam at a physician’s office called Doctors Goodman and Partridge, an exam she says that is 100% covered by her insurance carrier. Shannon explains, “I just had some questions and concerns about normal things that a young woman like me would have.”

Shannon says the exam was completely paid for by her insurance, however, she keeps getting a bill for $92 from the doctor’s office so, she called to find out why and, according to Shannon, she was told she asked too many questions during her exam.

She admits, “It makes me feel like next time I go to the doctor I shouldn’t share any of my questions or concerns or take any more time out of their day because I might be charged extra for that.”

Shannon maintains the questions she asked during her exam were all normal “female-related” questions and she cannot believe she would be charged. “I would completely understand this extra charge if there was another test done or something they do for my questions. But nothing! It was all verbal.”

The office of Doctors Goodman and Partridge would not talk to 3 On Your Side about Shannon’s case citing privacy issues but after our inquiry, they sent Shannon a letter saying, “The problems evaluated and managed at that visit were above and beyond the scope of a normal well woman exam” but, Shannon says that is nonsense and feels she is being billed for asking too many female-related questions, and taking up too much of the doctor’s time. Shannon tells 3TV, “I feel like there’s a stop watch every time I go to the doctor and they’re gonna be timing me and making sure I don’t go over that time and if I do then ‘Oh, there might be an additional charge for this.'”

High-Risk Screening Paps for Medicare Monday, Apr 27 2009 

Q0091 is for “obtaining the screening Pap”.  If you are doing a woman’s annual “high-risk” pap, you can use this code to obtain it.   If it were a diagnostic pap, this code would not apply.  And, if the physician is NOT doing the pelvic exam (G0101) annually for a high-risk patient, he is throwing money out the window, IMHO.

Medicare allows for a pelvic exam and screening pap every two years; however, if the patient is “high-risk” they are allowed to get a screening pap every 12 months. High-Risk Factors are:

Cervical Cancer High Risk Factors

* Early onset of sexual activity (under 16 years of age)
* Multiple sexual partners (five or more in a lifetime)
* Sexual partners who have multiple sexual partners
* History of a sexually transmitted disease (including HIV infection)
* Fewer than three negative Pap tests within the previous seven years

Vaginal Cancer High Risk Factors

* DES – exposed daughters of women who received DES during pregnancy
* Women (under age 65) who have not had a Pap test in 5 years or more.

High Risk Diagnosis Code= V15.89