Imagine that you are an independent contractor for a company that pays you a specific rate for a specified amount of work; however, if you do more than the specified amount of work you would receive an additional amount.  Now, if you were to do that additional amount of work separately you would receive 100 dollars.  But, if you do that additional amount of on the same day as your normal work load, you would receive your normal pay for your normal work load and 50 dollars for the additional amount of work.  Would that be acceptable to you?

To illustrate further, I do my work and earn $100.   Tomorrow, I fill in for someone else and do their work and earn $100.  Okay, that seems fair. Tomorrow, I not only do I do my job, but I also completely do someone else’s work.  As an independent contractor, should I receive $100 for my normal work and that’s it?  Should I receive $200 for a double workload?  How about if I only get $150…$100 for my work and $50 for completing someone else’s job?  I think many of us would say that I should receive $200!

Unfortunately, many physicians are experiencing the $150 example from health plans when it comes to providing medical care on the same day as a preventive medicine visit.  According to universal coding principles, it is expected that a physician will code an evaluation and management (Office Visit) for diagnostic (medical) issues when done on the same day as a preventive medicine (complete physical).  One of the primary reasons is so insurance companies do not have to reimburse for services outside their reimbursement policies; for example, if the patient does not have preventive medicine benefits but comes in for a physical, the physical can not be coded as a covered medical benefit just to get  paid.

In physician coding, we are trained to code all services accurately to represent what actually was performed and documented so as to not open the practice up to the risk of fraud and abuse allegations.  In theory, one would think that if there is a universal coding policy, then the service should be reimbursed in a consistent manner; however, this is not the case.  What we are seeing is that the majority of health plans will pay the problem visit at 50% and the physical at 100% (there’s your $150!).  A few others will not reimburse the problem visit at all on the same day as the physical (you only get $100…double the work at the pay of one job!).  Consequently, many physicians are telling patients that they cannot have both services performed on the same day, thus the physician is able to get full reimbursement for each service (aha! that’s where I put my $200!).

It is inconvenient to the patient to make two appointments; but with the increasing expenses that physician’s practices are having to absorb, it is just not possible to throw away all or half of a reimbursement.  In addition, it is inconvenient to other patients who are not able to get in to be seen because of the physician’s full schedules…or doing in two visits that which he can do in one.  Understandably so!  The physician should be reimbursed for all of his services fairly.  This will allow the physician to be able see additional patients who require medical attention and not play insurance games!